ISRAHELL: List of pro-Israelis at service for Hasbara

Arab world and surrounding region
Culture

Avi Jorisch
Terrorism Expert
Senior Fellow, Foundation for the Defense of Democracies
Office: 202-452-0650
Email: avi@defenddemocracy.org

Biography: Avi Jorisch is a senior fellow at the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, and he has written at length about Hizballah, al-Manar, and related subjects, with articles appearing in many prominent publications.  Mr. Jorisch was a Soref fellow at The Washington Institute for Near East Policy from 2001 to 2003, specializing in Arab and Islamic politics. More recently, he served as an Arab media and terrorism consultant for the Department of Defense.

Naomi Babbin
Managing Director, Center for Monitoring the Impact of Peace
Email: cmip@netvision.net.il

Biography: Naomi Babbin is the managing director for the Center for Monitoring the Impact of Peace, a non-political, non-governmental, not-for-profit organization monitoring school textbooks used in the Middle East to determine if they are critical of Israel and to pressure the various governments to change the way Israel is portrayed.

Dr. Daphne Burdman
Psychiatrist, Truman Research Institute for the Advancement of Peace,
Cell: 053-593-244
Home: 02-644-9370
Email: daphb@netvision.net.il

Biography: Dr Daphne Burdman is a psychiatrist who recently retired from the Harry S. Truman Research Institute for the Advancement of Peace. Her research is on martyrdom, indoctrination and the Palestinian education that teaches children to hate. She has written extensively on these topics.

Adina Shapiro
Director, Middle East Children’s Association,
Office: 703-761-3939

Biography: Adina Shapiro is a clinical social worker and therapist, and co-director of the Middle East Children’s Association (MECA), a joint Israeli Palestinian educational organization. She has served as Acting Director of the Institute for State Attorneys and Legal Advisors at the Israeli Ministry of Justice.  She trains Israeli and PA teachers, introducing programs of tolerance.  Her work has been nominated for Nobel Peace Prize.

Itamar Marcus
Director, Palestinian Media Watch,
Office: 02-625-4140
Cell: 050-528-4907
Email: itamar@pmw.org.il

Biography: Itamar Marcus is one of the founders of Palestinian Media Watch, Marcus is the current director. Mr. Marcus was also the Director of Research for the Center for Monitoring the Impact of Peace from 1998 – 2000, writing studies on Palestinian, Jordanian, and Syrian school textbooks. Mr. Marcus was a member of the Israeli delegation to the Trilateral Committee to Monitor Incitement established under the Wye Accords.

Barbara Crook
Palestinian Media Watch,
Office: 613-238-0933
Cell: 613-220-4570
Email: barbara@pmw.org.il

Biography: Barbara Crook is one of the founders of Palestinian Media Watch

Arab democracies; Terrorism; US Foreign Policy

Cliff May
President, Foundation for the Defense of Democracies
Office: 202-207-0719
Office direct: 202-207-0784
Email: cliff@defenddemocracy.org

Biography: Clifford D. May is the President of the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, a  policy institute focusing on terrorism created immediately following the 9/11 attacks on  the United States.  He previously worked as a foreign correspondent for the New York  Times.  He is a frequent guest on national and international television and radio news  programs, providing analysis and participating in debates on national security issues.

Arab-Israeli relations; human rights; Islamic fundamentalism; Arab nationalism; democratization; status of Christians and other Middle Eastern minorities

Dr. Walid Phares
Professor, Florida Atlantic University
Senior Fellow, Foundation for the Defense of Democracies
Office: 561-297-3215
Email: walid@defenddemocracy.org

Biography:  Born in Lebanon, Walid Phares is a professor of Middle East Studies and Senior Fellow at the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies.  He lectures to academic and community audiences worldwide on various subjects such as Islamic fundamentalism, Arab nationalism, democratization, human rights, the Arab-Israeli conflict, and the status of Christians and other Middle Eastern minorities. He has served as a board member of several national and international think tanks and human rights associations and is a leading advisor to several ethnic associations.

Arab-Israeli relations; US Foreign policy; Disengagement

David Makovsky
Senior Fellow, Washington Institute for Near East Policy,
Office: 202-452-0650
Email: davidm@washingtoninstitute.org

Biography: David Makovsky is a senior fellow at The Washington Institute for Near East Policy, where he focuses on Arab-Israel relations and US foreign policy to the Middle East. He is an award-winning journalist who has covered the Middle East peace process since 1989. Mr. Makovsky is the former executive editor of the Jerusalem Post, serving as diplomatic correspondent. In addition, he was the diplomatic correspondent for Israel’s leading daily Ha’aretz (1997-99) and had primary responsibility at both newspapers for covering the peace process. He also served as the US News special Jerusalem correspondent for twelve years.

Arab-Israeli relations; US Foreign policy; Terrorism

Frank Gaffney
President, Center for Security Policy,
Office: 202-835-9077
Email: gaffney@cenerforsecuritypolicy.org

Biography: Frank J. Gaffney, Jr., is the founder and President of the Center for Security Policy, a columnist for the Washington Times, an advisor for Americans for Victory over Terrorism, and a founding member of  Project for the New American Century

Arab-Israeli relations; US Foreign policy

Martin Indyk
Former Ambassador to Israel, Saban Center
Office: 202-797-6462
Email: sabancenter@brookings.edu

Biography: Amb. Martin Indyk Middle East expert and former U.S. Ambassador to Israel Martin S. Indyk joined the Brookings Institution on September 1, 2001, as a senior fellow in the Foreign Policy Studies Program. Ambassador Indyk served two tours in Israel, the first during the Rabin years (1995-97), and the second (2000-June 2001) during efforts to achieve a comprehensive peace and stem the violence of the intifada. During these periods, he helped to strengthen U.S-Israeli relations, reinforce the U.S. commitment to advance the peace process, and substantially increase the level of mutually beneficial trade and investment.

Arab-Israeli relations; US Foreign policy; Peace Process

Dennis Ross
Counselor, The Washington Institute
Office: 202-452-0650

Biography: Ambassador Dennis Ross is The Washington Institute’s counselor and Ziegler distinguished fellow. For more than twelve years, Ambassador Ross played a leading role in shaping U.S. involvement in the Middle East peace process and dealing directly with the parties in negotiations.  His book The Missing Peace: The Inside Story of the Fight for Middle East Peace (Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, August 2004) offers comprehensive analytical and personal insight into the Middle East peace process.

Arab-Israeli relations; US Foreign policy; Iran; nuclear weapons

Congressman Brad Sherman
US Congressman, Subcommitee for International Terrorism and Nonproliferation
Office: 202-225-5911
Web Site:www.house.gov/sherman/about/

Biography: Congressman Brad Sherman (D-CA) is the ranking Democrat on the Subcommittee for International Terrorism and Nonproliferation and is on The Israel Project’s board of advisors. He supports American solidarity with Israel in its efforts against terrorism. He has repeatedly expressed his support for Israel on the floor of Congress and in his work.

Arab-Israeli relations; Israeli governance; Peace Process

Gidi Grinstein
Founder and President, The Re’ut Institute
Office: 011-972-3-624-7770
Cell: 011-972-52-220-0565
Email: gidi@reut-institute.org

Biography: Gidi Grinstein is Founder and President of the Re’ut Institute, a non-governmental think tank serving the State of Israel with analysis of long-term impacts on near-term decisions. He has extensive experience in policy-planning working with the Economic Cooperation Foundation. Under the Barak government, Mr. Grinstein served as Negotiation Secretary and Assistant Chief of Negotiations, Secretary of the Israeli delegation to Permanent Status Negotiations, and as a member of the official negotiations team on the Sharm el-Sheikh Memorandum. He was a 2001-2002 Wexner-Israel Fellow at Harvard University and holds a Law degree from Tel Aviv.

Archaeology

Professor Joshua Schwartz
Bar-Ilan Univ, Land of Israel Studies
Office direct: 03-531-8233
Home: 02-993-2625

Art

Professor Daniel  Sperber
Bar-Ilan Univ, Art Program
Office direct: 03-531-8645
Home: 02-561-7423

Chemical and biological weapons in Arab countries

Dr. Danny Shoham
Col., Begin-Sadat Center,
Office direct: 03-696-8953
Home: 03-695-2822
Email: shoham_d@netvision.net.il

Biography: Ph.d. Tel Aviv University

Counter-terrorism

Boaz Ganor
Executive Director, International Policy Institute for Counter-Terrorism
Office: 972-9-952-7277
Web: http://www.ict.org.il

Development of Israeli media; Media and Politics

Professor Sam Lehman-Wilzig
Bar-Ilan Univ, Political Science
Office direct: 03-531-8578
Home: 03-922-6288

Disengagement from Gaza and Samaria; civil-political relations

Dr. Zeev Rosenhek
Professor, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Office: 011-972-2-588-3185 or 011-972-2-648-1162

Disengagement from Gaza and Samaria; conflict resolution

Dr. Gaberiel Horenczyk
Professor, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Office: 011-972-2-588-2031
Home: 011-972-2-570-1437

Disengagement from Gaza and Samaria; conflict resolution

Dr. Illan Yaniv
Psychologist, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Office: 011-972-2-588-3026 or 011-972-2-588-1373
Home: 011-972-2-581-5646

Disengagement from Gaza and Samaria; disengagement and public opinion

Dr. Reuven Hazan
Professor, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Office: 011-972-2-588-1117
Home: 011-972-2-533-3076

Disengagement from Gaza and Samaria; disengagement and resettlement

Dr. Shelley Fried
Professor, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Office: 011-972-2-654-1576
Cell: 011-972-52-250-8782

Disengagement from Gaza and Samaria; implications for society of disengagement

Professor Amia Lieblich
Psychologist, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Office: 011-972-2-588-3031 or 011-972-2-588-3044 or 011-972-2-588-1870
Home: 011-972-2-563-3152

Disengagement from Gaza and Samaria; international relations; conflict resolution; the evacuation of Yamit

Professor Yaacov Bar-Siman-Tov
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Office: 011-972-2-588-3150 or 011-972-2-588-2340
Home: 011-972-2-533-4122

Disengagement from Gaza and Samaria; Israeli and American-Jewish politics

Professor Peter Medding
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Office: 011-972-2-588-3269 or 011-972-2-588-3059
Home: 011-972-2-563-5105

Disengagement from Gaza and Samaria; Israeli politics

Dr. Gideon Rahat
Professor, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Office: 011-972-2-588-3274
Home: 011-972-2-679-5744

Disengagement from Gaza and Samaria; Israeli politics

Professor Itzhak Galnoor
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Office: 011-972-2-588-3160 or 011-972-2-560-5256
Home: 011-972-2-641-2406
Cell: 011-972-52-263-3091

Disengagement from Gaza and Samaria; law and politics in Israel

Dr. Menachem Hofnung
Professor, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Office: 011-972-2-588-3164
Home: 011-972-2-581-8132

Disengagement from Gaza and Samaria; military- civilian relations

Professor (Emeritus) Moshe Lissak
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Office: 011-972-2-563-6652

Disengagement from Gaza and Samaria; politics and the media

Professor Gadi Wolfsfeld
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Office: 011-972-2-588-3272
Home: 011-972-2-581-7680

Disengagement from Gaza and Samaria; U.S. role in the disengagement

Dr. Noam Kochavi
Professor, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Office: 011-972-2-588-3159
Home: 011-972-3-648-8786

Disengagement from Gaza and Samaria; U.S. role in the disengagement

Professor Michla Pomerance
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Office: 011-972-2-588-3151
Home: 011-972-2-563-5995

Disengagement from Gaza and Samaria; right-wing politics

Dr. Morchechai Nissan
Professor, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Office:011-972-2-588-2927
Home: 011-972-2-586-6350

Economy, industry, and financial sector

Professor Arye Hilman
Bar-Ilan Univ, Economics
Office direct: 03-531-8366
Home: 09-774-6424

Ethnicity, tradition and democracy– towards a new synthesis

Professor Avi Saguy
Bar-Ilan Univ, Philosophy
Office direct: 03-531-8421
Home: 03-619-7237

Final status negotiations; Israeli decision-making; Politics of the peace process; Settlers, settlements; Religion and party politics; Palestinian statehood – options and risks; Labor and Likud foreign policies; Israeli strategic thinking

Dr. Yossi Katz
Bar-Ilan Univ, Geography
Home: 02-993-1005

Biography: Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University is chairman of the political science department

Final status negotiations; Israeli decision-making; Politics of the peace process; Syria-Israel issues; Lebanon; Future of the Golan; Israeli Defense Forces- fighting doctrine, force structure, training, ongoing security operations

Major General Avraham Rotem
Bar-Ilan Univ,
Cell: 054-614-935
Home: 09-740-3329
Email: aromio@zahav.net.il

Biography: Ph.d. candidate at Bar-Ilan University

Final status negotiations; Israeli decision-making; Politics of the peace process; Syria-Israel issues; Lebanon; Future of the Golan; Palestinian statehood – options and risks; Labor and Likud foreign policies; Mideast military balance; Arms sales; Arms control; Nuclear weapons in the Mideast; Mideast space race; Missiles and satellites; NPT and other international control regimes; US-Israel strategic cooperation; U.S. Mideast defense policy force deployment; Gulf security; Arms sales; Regional commitments

Professor Gerald Steinberg
Begin-Sadat Center,
Office direct: 03-531-8043
Cell: 054-890-445
Home: 02-563-4426
Email: gerald@vms.huji.ac.il

Biography: PH.D. Cornell University is an associate professor of political science at Bar-Ilan University

Final status negotiations; Israeli decision-making; politics of the peace process; Syria-Israel issues; Lebanon; future of the Golan; Palestinian statehood – options and risks; Public opinion on national security issues; low intensity conflict; armed conflict with the PA; Israeli operations in south Lebanon; Terrorism/counter-terrorism; nuclear weapons in the Mideast; US-Israel strategic cooperation; Eastern Mediterranean strategic affairs; Israeli strategic ties with Turkey; Egypt’s role in regional affairs

Professor Efraim Inbar
Director, Begin-Sadat Center,
Office direct: 03-535-9198
Home: 02-587-0169
Email: inbare@mail.biu.ac.il

Biography: Ph.D. University of Chicago is Director of the Begin-Sadat (BESA) Center for Strategic Studies

Final status negotiations; Israeli decision-making; Politics of the peace process; Syria-Israel issues; Lebanon; Future of the Golan; The Palestinian Authority; Terrorism/Counter Terrorism; US-Israel strategic cooperation; U.S. Mideast defense policy force deployment. Gulf security, arms sales, regional commitments; Eastern Mediterranean strategic affairs; Israeli strategic ties with Turkey; Egypt’s role in regional affairs

Professor Barry Rubin
Director, Global Research for International Affairs center,
Office direct: 09-960-2736
Cell: 050-279-571
Home: 03-528-7298
Email: profbarryrubin@yahoo.com

Biography: Ph.d.  Georgetown University is Senior Resident Fellow at the BESA Center

Final status negotiations; Israeli decision-making; Politics of the peace process; The Palestinian Authority; Palestinian economy; PA aid politics; Mideast economic cooperation; Israel-Arab trade; Arab economies

Dr.  Hillel Frisch
Bar-Ilan Univ, Political Science
Office direct: 03-531-8872
Home: 02-535-3593
Email: hfrisch@mail.biu.ac.il

Biography: Ph.d. Hebrew University

Foreign Press Association
Glenys Sugarman, Executive Secretary
Office: 03-6916143

Higher education, universities

Professor Shlomo Eckstein
Bar-Ilan Univ, Past President of BIU
Office direct: 03-531-8919
Home: 08-946-2074

History of Zionism and the State

Professor Shmuel Sandler
Chairman, Bar-Ilan Univ, Political Science
Office direct: 03-531-8158
Cell: 054-674-597
Home: 02-586-9206
Email: sandls@mail.biu.ac.il

Holocaust and the aftermath

Professor Dan Michman
Bar-Ilan Univ, Jewish History
Office direct: 03-531-7251
Home: 03-936-2256

Human rights; terrorism; tyranny

Claudia Rosett
Journalist in Residence, Foundation for the Defense of Democracies
Office: 202-207-0190
Email: info@defenddemocracy.org

Bio:   Claudia Rosett writes on international affairs, drawing on 22 years experience as a journalist and editor, reporting from Asia, the former Soviet Union, Latin America and the Middle East. Currently based in New York, she writes a column, “The Real World,” on issues of tyranny and human rights, especially as these relate to the War on Terror, for The Wall Street Journal’s http://www.Opinionjournal.comand The Wall Street Journal Europe.   Recently she has reported from Lebanon, and written on issues involving the United Nations, foreign dissidents, and tyrants who in various ways threaten the democratic world.

IDF

Miri Eisin

Biography: Colonel (Ret.) Miri Eisin is recently retired from the IDF intelligence corps.  Eisin has  served in various branches of the intelligence division, as well as serving as assistant  to the Director of Military Intelligence (the present chief of staff). She was assigned  as a special spokesperson of the Israeli government during Operation Defensive Shield and  has recently been at the forefront of presenting Israel’s case to the media, on national  and international news stations worldwide.

Immigration and absorption

Dr. Dvora Hacohen
Bar-Ilan Univ, Land of Israel Studies
Office direct: 03-531-7690
Home: 02-563-6667

Intelligence services; Mossad and GSS; Media and the security establishment; Role of the media in political extremism

Dr. Shlomo Shpiro
Bar-Ilan Univ, Political Science
Office direct: 03-531-8108
Cell: 054-550-840
Home: 08-972-9036
Email: sshpiro@isdn.net.il

Biography: Ph.d. Birmingham University

Intifada background; IDF

Jacob Dallal
Cell: 50-835-9323
Email: jacobdallal@yahoo.com

Biography: Jacob Dallal serves as deputy head of the International Press Office of the IDF Spokesperson’s Unit, as spokesperson and liaison for the army with the press responsible for North American media.  Dallal holds the rank of captain. Dallal was born in Chicago and graduated from the University of Chicago.  He has appeared on television programs numerous times.

Iran

Ilan Berman
Vice President for Policy, American Foreign Policy Council and
Author, Tehran Rising:  Iran’s Challenge to the United States (2005)
Office direct: 202-543-1006

Larry Haas
Visiting Senior Fellow, Georgetown Public Policy Institute
Cell: 202-257-9592 (cell)
Web site: http://www.larryhaasonline.com

Jeremy Issacharoff
Deputy Chief of Mission, Embassy of Israel
Office: 202-364-5578 (office)
Web site: http://www.israelemb.org

Cliff May
President and Executive Director, The Foundation for the Defense of Democracies
Office:202-207-0190
Office direct: 202-207-0184
E-mail: cliff@defenddemocracy.org
Web site: http://www.defenddemocracy.org

Jennifer Laszlo Mizrahi
Founder and President, The Israel Project
Office: 202-857-6644
Web site: http://www.theisraelproject.org

U.S. Rep. Brad Sherman, D-Calif.
Member, Committee on International Relations; Ranking Member, Subcommittee on International Terrorism, Nonproliferation and Human Rights
Office: 202-225-5911
Web site: http://www.house.gov/sherman/about/

Ken Timmerman
President, Middle East Data Project, Inc.,
Author, “Countdown to Crisis: The Coming Nuclear Showdown with Iran” (2005)
Office: 301-946-2918
E-mail: timmerman.road@verizon.net;
Web site: http://www.KenTimmerman.com

In Israel:
Professor Ze’ev Maghen
The Begin-Sadat Center for Strategic Studies, Bar-Ilan University
Office: 011-972-3-531-7812
Cell: 011-972-52-383-4069
Web site: http://www.biu.ac.il/SOC/besa/

Iran; proliferation; terrorism; international law and international organizations; Middle East security issues; U.S.-Israel strategic cooperation

Ilan Berman
Vice President for Policy, American Foreign Policy Council
Office direct: 202-543-1006
Fax: 202-543-1007
Email: berman@afpc.org

Biography: Ilan Berman is Vice President for Policy of the Washington-based American Foreign Policy Council.  An expert on regional security in the Middle East, Central Asia, and the Russian Federation, he has consulted for both the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency and the U.S. Department of Defense, and provided assistance on foreign policy and national security issues to a range of governmental agencies and congressional offices.  Mr. Berman is Adjunct Professor for International Law and Global Security at the National Defense University in Washington, D.C.  He serves as a member of the reconstituted Committee on the Present Danger, and as Editor of the Journal of International Security Affairs.  He is the author of “Tehran Rising: Iran’s Challenge to the United States” (Rowman & Littlefield, 2005).

Israel Defense Forces- dissent and disobedience within the army, anti-terrorist undercover units and special operations, manpower policies, civil-military relations

Professor Stuart A. Cohen
Begin-Sadat Center for Strategic Studies, Political Science
Office direct: 03-531-8958
Home: 03-921-9986
Email: cohenst@mail.biu.ac.il

Biography: Ph.D. Oxford University

Israeli Arab Affairs expert; Islamic Movement

Dr. Mordechai Kedar
Begin-Sadat Center,
Office direct: 03-531-8073
Cell: 054-477-8908
Home: 09-744-9162

Israeli history; Israeli-American relations

Mitch Bard
Executive Director, American-Israeli Cooperative Enterprise,
Office: 301-565-3918
Email: mgbard@aol.com
Web Site: http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org

Biography: Mitch Bard is the Executive Director of the American-Israeli Cooperative Enterprise and a foreign policy analyst who lectures frequently on U.S. – Middle East policy. He also serves as the director of the Jewish Virtual Library.  He previously worked as the editor of The Near East Report and as a senior analyst in the polling division of the 1988 Bush campaign.

Israeli strategic thinking; Israel Defense Forces- dissent and disobedience within the army, anti-terrorist undercover units and special operations, manpower policies, civil-military relations; Israel Defense Forces- fighting doctrine, force structure, training, ongoing security operations

Dr. Avi  Kober
Major, Bar-Ilan Univ, Political Science
Office direct: 03-531-7936
Home: 09-740-6040
Email: avik@doubt.com

Biography: P.h.D Hebrew University

Israeli-American relations

Malcolm Hoenlein
Executive Vice Chairman, Conference of Presidents of Major Jewish Organizations
Office: 212-318-6111
Email: info@conferenceofpresidents.org

Israeli-American relation; American Jewish Community

Biography: Michael Gelman serves as chairman of The Israel project and recently completed three terms as president of The Jewish Federation of Greater Washington and is the new President of its Endowment Fund. Gelman is chairman of the United Jewish Communities Human Services and Social Policy Pillar and the UJC Birthright Committee. Mr. Gelman also sits on the boards of several organizations including the Jewish Agency for Israel, for which he chairs the Aliyah and Klitah Budget Subcommittee.

Israeli-American relations; American Jewish Community

Shoshana S. Cardin
Home: 410-486-2333
Email: shoshanaca@aol.com

Biography: Shoshana Cardin, born in Tel-Aviv in 1926, is a graduate of both UCLA and John Hopkins University. She is the president of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency and has worked extensively in advancing the rights of women.

Jewish refugees from Arab countries

Professor Ada Aharoni
President, IFLAC,
Office: 972-4-8243230

Mordechai Ben-Porat
Babylonian Jewry Heritage Center,
Office: 03-533-9278
Email: babylon@babylonjewry.org.il

Shlomo Hillel
Office: 02-641-1416
Cell: 050-233-202

Asher Naim
Office: 972-2-679-2273
Email: anaim@mofet.macam98.ac.il

Military technologies & industries

Professor Zeev Bonen
Begin-Sadat Center,
Cell: 054-977-296
Home: 04-837-7787
Email: bonen@elronet.co.il

Biography: Ph.d. Cambridge University was the director-general and president of ‘Rafael’ and today serves as a research director for the Israeli Government’s Chief Scientist

Mother/Father of terror victim

Aviva Raziel
Cell: 050-809339
Home: 02-586-5681

Biography: Aviva Raziel was the mother of Michal Raziel, who was slain last August with her best friend and neighbor Malkie Roth, 15, and 13 others, including six children, when a suicide bomber attacked the Sbarro restaurant in the heart of Jerusalem.  At age fifty, she was a neonatal intensive care unit nurse at Hadassah Hospital for the past 25 years, had seen her share of life’s triumphs and tragedies.  Despite her husband’s two year battle with brain cancer in 1990, she raised four daughters – three of whom since married. But nothing prepared her for seeing “my lovely, beautiful, caring child,” Michal, 16, at Shaare Zedek Medical Center’s morgue

Frimet Roth
Cell: 055-746337

Biography: Frimet Roth was the mother of Malki Roth, 15 years old, originally from Melbourne, Australia, who, while dining with her best friend at the Sbarro in Jerusalem, was killed in a suicide bombing on August 9, 2001.  Her best friend was Michal Raziel, and she was also a victim of the Sbarro bombing.  Frimet Roth, is a freelance reporter who often writes for The Jerusalem Post.

Mother/Father of terror victim; Activist for Security Fence

Leah and Yossi  Zur
Cell: 054-424-8912
Home: 04-8248912

Biography: Lea and Yossi Zur and parents of Assaf Zur, who was a victim of a suicide bomb on a local bus in Haifa’s Carmeliya neighbourhood on March 5, 2003.  He was also a student of ORT Hannah Szenesh.  Assaf was only seventeen.

Arnold Roth
Home: 02-586-8937

Biography: Arnold Roth was the father of Malki Roth, 15 years old, originally from Melbourne, Australia, who, while dining with her best friend at the Sbarro in Jerusalem, was killed in a suicide bombing on August 9, 2001.  Her best friend was Michal Raziel, and she was also a victim of the Sbarro bombing.

Florence Bianu
Email: fbianu@gmail.com

Biography: Florence Biano was the mother of Mark Biano, who was 29 years old and one of 21 people killed in the suicide bombing carried out by a female terrorist from Jenin in the Maxim restaurant in Haifa on October 4, 2003.  Mark’s wife, Naomi (25), also was killed in the bombing.  Mark Biano was a reporter for a local Haifa cable TV news magazine, News of the Day and usually was the reporter who, ironically, covered terrorist attacks.

Seth and Sherri Mandel
Office: 02-6483758
Cell: 052-5225642

Motivation to serve in the IDF

Dr. Yaakov Katz
School of Education,
Office direct: 03-531-8557
Home: 02-993-1279

Music

Professor Edwin Serrousi
Bar-Ilan Univ, Musicology
Office direct: 03-531-8090
Home: 02-679-3885

Palestinian and Arab school textbooks

Naomi Babbin
Managing Director, Center for Monitoring the Impact of Peace
Email: cmip@netvision.net.il

Biography: Naomi Babbin is the managing director for the Center for Monitoring the Impact of Peace, a non-political, non-governmental, not-for-profit organization monitoring school textbooks used in the Middle East to determine if they are critical of Israel and to pressure the various governments to change the way Israel is portrayed.

Palestinian culture of hate

Nonie Darwish
Email: nonie@noniedarwish.com

Biography: Nonie Darwish speaks out against the divisive Wahabist ideology that is poisoning the Middle East and US. Raised in the Gaza Strip, Darwish grew up in conditions of intense hatred and anti-Semitic indoctrination. As an adult, she moved to America realized the full impact of indoctrinated hate she experienced and now speaks out against all around the world.

Palestinian economy; PA aid politics; Mideast economic cooperation; Israel-Arab trade; Arab economies

Dr. Gil Feiler
Begin-Sadat Center,
Office direct: 03-751-2780
Cell: 050-532-266
Home: 03-648-5297
Email: ipr@netvision.net.il

Biography: P.h.D Tel Aviv University is a consultant to the Israel-America Chamber of Commerce and on the board of the Israel-Palestine Center for Research and Information

Palestinian Liberation Organization

Walid Shoebat
Office: 877-832-7200
Email: walid@shoebat.com

Biography: Walid Shoebat was a member of the Palestinian Liberation Organization and participated in acts of terror and violence against Israel. He was imprisoned for his actions. But after studying the Jewish Bible he came to realize that what he had been taught about Jews and Israel was wrong, and he then made it his mission to spread the truths that he had learned.

Palestinian media; Palestinian polling

Dr. Aaron Lerner
Director, Independent media Review and Analysis,
Office: 972-9-760-4719
Email: imra@netvisaion.net.il

Biography: Dr. Aaron Learner is Director of Independent Media Review and Analysis.  IMRA, Independent Media Review and Analysis, was founded in 1992, by Drs. Aaron and Joseph Lerner, as an ongoing analysis of developments in Arab-Israeli relations. Awarded credentials by the Government of Israel as a news organization, IMRA provides an extensive digest of media, polls and significant interviews and events.

Palestinian press; Arab-Israeli relations

Khaled Abu Toameh
Journalist, The Jerusalem Post, Arab Affairs
Cell: 050-331-600
Email: khaledat@zahav.net.il

Biography: Khaled Abu Toameh, an Israeli Arab, is the West Bank and Gaza correspondent for the Jerusalem Post and U.S. News and World Report.  He previously served as a senior writer for the Jerusalem Report, and a correspondent for Al-Fajr. He has produced several documentaries on the Palestinians for the BBC and other networks, exposing the connection between Arafat and payments to the armed wing of Fatah and the financial corruption within the Palestinian Authority. He has been threatened by Palestinian leaders over his work.

Palestinian public opinion research

Khalil Shikaki
Director, Palestinian Center for Policy and Survey Research,
Office: 972-2-296-4933
Email: kshikaki@pcpsr.org

Biography: Khalil Shikaki is an Associate Professor of Political Science, and Director of the  Palestinian Center for Policy and Survey Research (Ramallah).  Dr. Shikaki has conducted  more than 100 polls among Palestinians in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip since 1993.

Palestinian suicide bombers; Palestinian and Arab school textbooks

Dr. Daphne Burdman
Psychiatrist, Truman Research Institute for the Advancement of Peace,
Cell: 053-593-244
Home: 02-644-9370
Email: daphb@netvision.net.il

Biography: Dr Daphne Burdman is a psychiatrist who recently retired from the Harry S. Truman Research Institute for the Advancement of Peace. Her research is on martyrdom, indoctrination and the Palestinian education that teaches children to hate. She has written extensively on these topics.

Palestinian textbooks; Syrian textbooks; Jordanian textbooks; Palestinian media

Itamar Marcus
Director, Palestinian Media Watch,
Office: 02-625-4140
Cell: 050-528-4907
Email: itamar@pmw.org.il

Biography: Itamar Marcus is one of the founders of Palestinian Media Watch, Marcus is the current director. Mr. Marcus was also the Director of Research for the Center for Monitoring the Impact of Peace from 1998 – 2000, writing studies on Palestinian, Jordanian, and Syrian school textbooks. Mr. Marcus was a member of the Israeli delegation to the Trilateral Committee to Monitor Incitement established under the Wye Accords.

Barbara Crook
Palestinian Media Watch,
Office: 613-238-0933
Cell: 613-220-4570
Email: barbara@pmw.org.il

Biography: Barbara Crook is one of the founders of Palestinian Media Watch

Religion and state; the Israeli judicial system; constitutional issues and conflicts

Professor Yedidia Stern
Bar-Ilan Univ, Law
Office direct: 03-531-8414
Home: 02-673-1122

Religious society and religious groupings and attitudes towards the Zionist enterprise

Professor Menachem Friedman
Bar-Ilan Univ, Sociology
Office direct: 03-531-8624
Home: 08-934-9184

Scientific advancement

Professor Shlomo Grossman
Bar-Ilan Univ, Life Sciences
Office direct: 03-531-8050
Home: 03-612-5511

Settlement and development of Jerusalem

Professor Zeev Safrai
Bar-Ilan Univ, Land of Israel Studies
Office direct: 03-531-8536
Cell: 069-98-423

Survivors of Terror Attacks

Gila Weiss
Home: 972-5-599-0836

Biography: Gila Weiss is a Maryland native who moved to Israel and was the victim of a terrorist attack in 2002. She was 27 at the time of the attack and suffered a severe gash on her head and extensive damage to her eyes and face from flying shrapnel. The attack was a suicide attack carried out by a woman, and the Al Aqsa Martyrs Brigade claimed responsibility for the attack.

Eliad Moreh
The David Project,
Home: 617-428-0012
Email: eliadmoreh@hotmail.com

Biography: Eliad Moreh survived the fatal terror attack at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem on July 31, 2002. In the bombing’s aftermath, Eliad’s stunning picture and words were beamed across the world. Moreh, an Israeli of French-Iraqi origin, holds an M.A. from the Hebrew University in Modern Art. She has been interviewed in the New York Post, Fox News, and other international news venues. As a survivor of Islamist terror, Moreh strongly believes that observers in the West must condemn terrorism of any kind and take seriously radical Islam’s threat against the Western world and minority cultures.

Teaching peace in Israel

Yael Barkol
Office: 09-771-0633
Home: 06-754-8469
Email: gybarkol@zahav.net.il

Biography: Israeli school teacher who teaches peace in her classroom.

Zehava Kaufman
Office: 09-766-3770
Home: 06-434-9498
Email: ztmmn@013.net.il

Biography: Israeli school teacher who teaches peace in her classroom.

Barbara Uri
Home: 09-891-0788
Email: ojacob@inter.net.il

Biography: Israeli school teacher who teaches peace in her classroom.

Teaching kids peace; Palestinian and Arab school textbooks

Adina Shapiro
Director, Middle East Children’s Association,
Office: 703-761-3939

Biography: Adina Shapiro is a clinical social worker and therapist, and co-director of the Middle East Children’s Association (MECA), a joint Israeli Palestinian educational organization. She has served as Acting Director of the Institute for State Attorneys and Legal Advisors at the Israeli Ministry of Justice.  She trains Israeli and PA teachers, introducing programs of tolerance.  Her work has been nominated for Nobel Peace Prize.

Terrorism; Middle East politics; Arab-Israeli Affairs

Aaron Mannes
Author, TerrorBlog and Profiles in Terror: The Guide to Middle East Terrorist Organizations
E-mail: author@profilesinterror.com

Biography: Aaron Mannes analyzes terrorist networks at the University of Maryland’s Semantic Web Agents Group.  He has consulted for a range of government agencies on various international security and homeland security issues.

Mannes has written numerous articles on Middle East affairs, terrorism, and other international security issues for popular and scholarly publications including Policy Review, The Wall Street Journal Europe, The Jerusalem Post, National Review Online, The New York Post, Weekly Standard, and the Journal of International Security Affairs. He speaks throughout the United States, has been interviewed on radio and television worldwide, and is a Contributing Expert to the CounterTerrorism Blog (counterterrorismblog.org).

Terrorism; US foreign policy

Andrew C. McCarthy
Legal Commentator, Terrorism Expert
Senior Fellow, Foundation for the Defense of Democracies
Office:  202-207-0190
Email: info@defenddemocracy.org

Biography:  Andrew C. McCarthy is a former federal prosecutor and a contributor at National Review Online.  Following the September 11 attacks, Mr. McCarthy supervised the U.S. Attorney’s Anti-Terrorism Command Post in New York City, coordinating investigative and preventive efforts with numerous federal and state law enforcement and intelligence agencies.  He writes extensively on a variety of legal, social and political issues for National Review and Commentary, among other publications, as well as providing commentary for various television and radio broadcasts.

Terrorism; Arab culture, politics, and media

Avi Jorisch
Terrorism Expert
Senior Fellow, Foundation for the Defense of Democracies
Office: 202-452-0650
Email: avi@defenddemocracy.org

Biography: Avi Jorisch is a senior fellow at the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, and he has written at length about Hizballah, al-Manar, and related subjects, with articles appearing in many prominent publications.  Mr. Jorisch was a Soref fellow at The Washington Institute for Near East Policy from 2001 to 2003, specializing in Arab and Islamic politics. More recently, he served as an Arab media and terrorism consultant for the Department of Defense.

The interplay between democracy, religion, and society

Professor Ella Belfer
Bar-Ilan Univ, Political Science
Office direct: 03-531-8274
Home: 03-934-0071

Water problems and solutions; Eastern Mediterranean strategic affairs; Israeli strategic ties with Turkey; Egypt’s role in regional affairs

Dr. Amikam Nachmani
Bar-Ilan Univ, Political Science
Office direct: 03-531-8044
Home: 02-566-4391
Email: nachma@mail.biu.ac.il

Biography: P.h.D Oxford University

Dr. Jonathan  Rynhold
Bar-Ilan Univ, Political Science
Office direct: 03-531-8108
Home: 08-972-7220
Email: rynhold@mail.biu.ac.il

Biography: Ph.D. London School of Economics

Women’s rights in the Middle East; Middle East democracy

Eleana Gordon
Senior Vice President, Foundation for the Defense of Democracies
Office: 202-207-0190
Email: info@defenddemocracy.org

Biography:    Eleana Gordon oversees FDD’s democracy programs and communications, with a focus on promoting pro-democracy, anti-terrorism activists from the Islamic world. Ms. Gordon helped establish the Women for a Free Iraq, a campaign by over a hundred Iraqi women to rally support for the liberation of Iraq.   She works closely with Iraqi women’s groups such as the Women’s Alliance for the Democratic Iraqand the Iraqi Women’s High Council to advocate for a democratic Iraqi government that secures individual freedom and women’s rights.  She previously worked with former Secretary Jack Kemp on foreign policy issues.

Ref: theisraelproject.org

FIGHT ISRAHELL: THE PROPAGANDA DOCTRINE FOR THE PRO-ISRAELIS (warning this is real shit!)

SOME HIGHLIGTS
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Bild 5
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PRO-ISRAELI ORG: Honestreporting (from my Israeli racist ass)

their history

“It was Yom Kippur, 2000. The Intifada had just broken out and a huge wave of terror had suddenly descended upon Israel. The media in Europe was twisting the story to brand Israel as a bad guy! Jews in the UK were in shock and felt under attack. A few idealists decided enough was enough.

In February of 2006, under a fresh management team, HonestReporting was granted independent Charitable Organization status in Israel to complement its US and Canadian status.”

their mission

“As an organization dedicated to defending Israel against prejudice in the Media, we aim to provide educational tools and resources to anyone wishing to advocate for Israel. Our materials provide people with information that is helpful when responding to the Media, in their dealings on Campus or in the work place, and in any other sphere where having credible, considered background material is of value.”

some endorsment

Bob Diener
Founder Hotels.com; Founder and President Consumer Club

“HonestReporting is the champion of accurate reporting of the Arab-Israeli conflict. With so many reporters tilting their stories for political objectives or due to intimidation and pressure by non-democratic regimes, HonestReporting is exposing such bias against Israel and is the watchdog attempting to keep them honest. HonestReporting is a respected, reliable source that is at the forefront of stopping the attempt by many in the Arab world to re-write history.”

Ref: “Honest reporting”

And now a message from the “rightous” right…

Ref: Jewish Republicans Coalition

Pro-israeli mythbuster

Q: What exactly is “the occupation”?

A: In 1967, Israel defeated the neighboring Arab countries in a war that lasted only six days. At the end of that war, Israel had captured the West Bank (which includes the Eastern half of Jerusalem), the Gaza Strip and the Golan Heights. (It also captured the Sinai Peninsula, but this was later returned to Egypt as part of a peace accord that holds to this day). Some of this territory was annexed, specifically the Golan Heights and East Jerusalem. The rest of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip has been under a military occupation ever since. This means that the Israeli army has complete control over these areas. Palestinians in these regions have no guarantee of civil rights. They have no government of their own other than what Israel will allow. Israel can impose total curfews on any part or all of the territory. This prevents people from traveling to work, to market or to see family members. It can prevent medical care from reaching people, and people from reaching hospitals. Occupation means the Israeli military has total authority over every aspect of Palestinian life. return to top

Q: Didn’t Ehud Barak offer the Palestinians almost everything they wanted at Camp David in 2000? And didn’t the Palestinians respond to that offer by launching this much more violent Intifada?

A: Reports vary about what was actually offered at Camp David, but it is clear that the offer was a lot less generous than Barak has claimed. What we know is that the Palestinians were offered sovereignty over a very small part of Jerusalem, and that their capitol would have actually been in Abu Dis, a small suburb, and not in Jerusalem itself. The so-called 95% of the West Bank excluded all of the Greater Jerusalem area, which has grown considerably since 1967. Israel would also have maintained control of much of the Jordan Valley, for an indefinite security period. Thus, along with the proposed accommodations for certain key Israeli settlements, the offer was actually about 80% of the West Bank. Further, according to maps publicized by Gush Shalom and the Israeli Committee Against House Demolitions, the areas remaining under Israeli control would have effectively split the West bank in two and would have surrounded the Palestinian areas. For this, the Palestinians were to give up all claims resulting from the mass expulsion in 1948. Having already conceded 78% of what was once Mandatory Palestine, this did not strike the Palestinians as a ?generous offer?. It is true that Barak?s offer was much more than had ever been offered the Palestinians before. But this really says more about previous offers than it does about the Camp David offer. After seven years of the Oslo Process, which saw Palestinian standards of living decline markedly and the greatest period of Israeli settlement expansion by far, it was impossible for any Palestinian leader to compromise this far. For more on Camp David and the beginning of the current uprising, follow this link. return to top

Q: Don’t we have to support Israel because it is surrounded by countries that want to destroy it?

A: The ongoing occupation of Palestinian territories is the single most destabilizing factor in Israeli-Arab relations. The Arab League has offered full normalization of relations with Israel if the occupation ends. UN Security Council Resolution 242 calls for just such a settlement. Both Egypt and Jordan have long-standing peace treaties with Israel and both countries have honored those treaties. The best way to make Israelis more secure is to end the occupation, creating defensible borders and working relationships with their neighbors. This would allow for normalized relationships and create great incentives for everyone concerned to maintain peaceful relations with each other. return to top

Q: Isn’t Israel the only democracy in the Middle East, surrounded by dictatorships?

A: While it is certainly true that Israel?s democratic structures are considerably more advanced than those of its neighbors, Israel fails on many counts. Discriminatory laws and bureaucratic practices in Israel bar Arabs in Israel from many privileges, especially owning land. Other systems tie certain opportunities to service in the army, from which most Arab Israelis are barred. There is a huge gap in municipal services between Jewish and non-Jewish areas in Israel. So-called ?unrecognized villages?, which are Arab towns that are not recognized by Israel as organized municipalities, receive virtually no services and are often subject to demolition or confiscation. Arabs families are routinely denied building permits and have their homes demolished if they build or add on to them without such permits. And all of this only deals with the situation for Arabs within the pre-1967 borders. Palestinians under Israeli occupation enjoy no civil or human rights, except those that depend on the whim of the commanders or soldiers in charge. Israel has legalized practices that are considered abusive in its interrogation procedures, detains Palestinians without charge for extensive periods, imposes unilateral and deadly curfews, and denies freedom of travel. By international human rights standards, these are not the hallmarks of a highly functioning democracy. Problems of democracy, as Edward Said often pointed out, are quite severe in the Arab world, but that does not excuse the shortcomings Israel has in its own right. There is much to be proud of in Israeli democracy, but there is also much to be very concerned about. return to top

Q: But didn’t the Arab countries kick a million Jews out of their countries after the 1948 war?

A: In the wake of the 1948 war, the backlash against Jews in the Arab world was often severe. Anger over the growing Zionist movement had been building throughout the 1940s, and it was too often directed at Arab Jewish communities, regardless of those communities? views of the Zionist project in Palestine.

British and French colonialism had created great hostility toward those countries in the Arab world. This resulted in a higher level of antipathy toward Jews than was normal for the Muslim world historically, though as has generally been the case, such anti-Semitism was far less severe than what existed at the time in Europe.
Israel initiated airlift and other emigration programs to bring in as many Jews from Middle Eastern countries as possible. Sadly, the treatment these new ?migr?s received in Israel was far from what they had expected (for more information, see Tom Segev’s book, 1949: The First Israelis).

Still, there is no doubt that many Arabs simply reacted out of fear and anger toward their own Jewish neighbors after the war that saw Israel?s birth and the expulsion of some 750,000-1,000,000 Arabs from what had once been called Palestine. The Arab world itself was only just emerging from the era of European colonialism in the wake of World War II, and instability was the rule of the day throughout the Middle East. As is often the case, minorities, especially Jews, are all too typical victims of such upheaval. return to top

Q: I see people compare Israeli law to Apartheid, what’s the truth?

A: There are major differences between Apartheid in South Africa and Israel’s treatment of the Palestinians. But these are growing smaller all the time. Arab citizens of Israel face serious discrimination (see question above). But they are full citizens, and do participate in Israeli politics. They also have a relatively high standard of living, as compared to other Arab countries (though not as compared to Israeli Jews). But Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza enjoy no rights of citizenship, no real protection of law. This was not the case for Black South Africans. In the sense of there being two standards that are so different, the comparison to Apartheid is apt. And, as the occupation becomes more institutionalized, many Israelis believe that outright Apartheid is exactly what the future holds. return to top

Q: I only hear about Palestinian terrorist or nationalist groups. Where is the Palestinian “voice for peace”?

A: There are many different Palestinian peace groups, just as there are many different Israeli and Jewish peace groups. Unfortunately, we hear little about them in the media, even the Israeli and Arab media. But they are active, and, just like the Israeli peace camp, some part of them is also reflected in Palestinian leadership.
It was Israel that cut off negotiations with the Palestinian Authority in January 2001 at Taba, when, according to all parties involved, a deal had never been closer. Ehud Barak was about to be voted out, and he felt unable to present compromises to the Israeli public amid the violence that was occurring and being at the end of his tenure. From reports from both sides, this included being closer than ever to an agreement on the Palestinian refugees, final borders and Jerusalem. Surely this indicates some willingness, on both sides, to reach peace.

There are many Palestinian groups and individuals who are working for peace and justice for both sides. These include the Palestinian National Initiative led by Mustafa Barghouti; the Miftah human rights NGO led by Hanan Ashrawi; the Palestinian Center for Rapprochement in Bet Sahur; the Holy Land Trust in Bethlehem; the Palestinian Center for Human Rights led by Raji Sourani; Wi?am, the Palestinian Center for Conflict Resolution, headed by Zoughbi Zoughbi; the respected psychiatrist Iyad al-Sarraj in Gaza, who has been the head of the Palestinian Independent Commission for Citizens’ Rights; the joint Palestinian-Israeli women’s peace group, the Jerusalem Link, whose Palestinian half is called the Jerusalem Center for Women. Many of these groups are known throughout the Palestinians territories and are enormously respected. They are all quite active, and there are many similar groups.

Rema Hammami and Saleh Abdel Jawad ? both professors at Birzeit University -initiated in November, 2000 a public call for Palestinians not to use violence in the second intifada, and it was signed by over 120 fellow professors in Palestine. Many Palestinians and Israelis have been engaged in joint non-violent demonstrations against the wall in several different formations in recent months. The list of examples of Palestinian peace workers and peace groups could go on much longer. We can only wonder why the media on all sides continues to pay them so little attention.

Yet we must remain aware that the situation is not symmetrical. There is an occupier and an occupied. And the occupied have a right under international law to resist, and even to use armed force in resisting occupation (though this absolutely does not include attacks on civilians). It is crucial to appreciate that the situation is not simply one of “a cycle of violence,” but that the Israeli side has been conducting an occupation in violation of both international law and public opinion. That allows people to imagine that the solution is for both sides to compromise somewhere in between on the basis of simple non-violence. Oslo was an attempt to do that and it failed miserably. The violence of the Palestinians today is part of the price of that failure. Until an Israeli political leader clearly says that the occupation must end for the violence on both sides to stop, it will be difficult to come to a negotiated settlement. return to top

Q: I also see people talk about Zionism being racism. But it’s also a liberation movement. I’m confused and uncomfortable.

A: This is a very difficult question for many Jews. Zionism means Jewish nationalism, and any form of nationalism, by definition, puts the interests of its own group ahead of others. In the early days of Zionism, there were many different strains of thought, and many different ideologies. Some were much more progressive and humanistic than others. Zionism arose as a response to both the massive increase in Jewish assimilation after the Enlightenment, and to persistent and growing anti-Semitism throughout Europe. But many of the Jews who came to Palestine in the early 20th century were told that there were no people inhabiting that land, when in actuality over 700,000 Arabs were there. There were exceptions. The Cultural Zionism of Ahad Ha?am, for instance, recognized the rights of the Arabs already living on the land. Other early Zionist thinkers also had a variety of reasons for wanting to find a way to live in peace with their Arab neighbors, with respect to their rights. But it is fair to say that most strains of even early Zionism were at best disdainful of the Palestinian people.

Even though modern ideologies like Liberalism and Communism had diminished the influence of religion in most Western countries, anti-Semitism continued to flourish. The Holocaust was the ultimate expression of a new, largely secular form of anti-Semitism, and it seemed to confirm the most ominous warnings of many of the Zionists of the day. The Holocaust gave Zionism legitimacy in many people?s minds. After such a horrifying genocide and the experience of having the world close its eyes and borders to the atrocity, did the Jews not deserve a state of their own? Perhaps so, but the Palestinians, who had nothing to do with the Holocaust, were the people who were made to provide that state.

As Israel became more stable and strong, new waves of Zionism flourished. Today?s Likud Coalition was once a minority among Zionists, but today they head the most stable government Israel has seen in a quarter of a century. Religious Zionism grew stronger after the 1967 war and the capture of the Jewish holy sites in East Jerusalem (from which Jews had been barred by Jordan since 1948). Zionism remains a tangled web of various ideologies. Many aspects of it are certainly horribly hostile to Arabs. Other aspects remain dedicated to an idealism that leads its believers to work for peace and co-existence. Zionism has changed over the years as well. Where once there were more than a few Zionists who opposed the idea of a Jewish state, today the meaning of the term only encompasses those who are committed to a state that is Jewish in character, although differences still remain over such issues as laws that discriminate against non-Jews and the question of whether Israel should be the state of its citizens or the state of the entire Jewish people. return to top

Q: But I have heard that the Palestinians and other Arabs sided with the Nazis in World War II.

A: It is true that much of the Arab world did side with the Axis in World War II. As the British and French had been colonial powers in the Arab world since the end of World War I, this was not surprising. In most cases, the Nazi’s racist ideology had nothing to do with that calculation. In the case of the Palestinians, however, their most prominent leader, Hajj Amin al-Husayni, specifically aligned himself with the Nazis and their genocidal program against Jews. Husayni’s statements and acts of solidarity with the Nazis cast a pall over the Palestinian movement that continues to this day. But the fact is, Husayni’s acts, as contemptible as they were, had little effect on Jews either in Europe or in Palestine. Husayni’s actions and views regarding anti-Semitism were his own and there is little evidence that they represented any significant measure of the Palestinian people at the time. That Husayni was a severe Jew-hater is clear. But the evidence from the time suggests that this view had little traction among Palestinians and Arabs of the day. return to top

Q: I’ve heard that the Palestinians left Israel on their own or under order from Arab leaders in 1948. Is this so?

A: There were between 650,000 and 1.2 million Palestinians who left the area that was to become Israel in 1948. The circumstances of their departure varied. The records of the Hagana (the Jewish militia which later became the Israeli army) show that there were some official plans to empty Palestinian towns and villages. Records also clearly show that there were at least several instances of Palestinian towns suffering massacres at the hands of Israeli soldiers (both sides launched numerous attacks on civilians, especially in the early part of the war). Minutes from meetings of different Jewish leadership groups also indicate that there was definitely a desire to see as much of a Jewish majority in whatever territory would end up being Israel?s as possible. There is also clear evidence that some of the more radical Jewish militias attacked Palestinian towns with the goal of spreading fear in the Arab populace, in the hopes that this would make them flee.

It has often been claimed that the Arab Higher Committee broadcast a call for the Palestinians to flee so that the invading Arab armies could defeat the Zionists and then the Palestinians could return. No such call was ever issued. There were, of course, calls to move women and children out of the path of the fighting, but there was never a call for all civilians to leave. Many of the Palestinians fled in the very early stages of the war, long before any such call would have been issued in any case.

As the fighting intensified, and more villages came under attack, more and more Palestinians fled the war. Organized expulsions also continued. In some areas, especially cities like Haifa and Yaffo, where Arabs and Jews had lived together in relative stability, there were efforts made by Jews to get their neighbors to stay, and these met with some success at times. As today, there was a great variety of views among Jews in Palestine/Israel.

But whatever the circumstances, Israel went beyond its rights in passing laws to prevent the Palestinians from returning after the war. International law requires countries to allow people who flee a war back to their homes when the war ends. Israel was specifically enjoined to do so by the United Nations after the war, but did not comply. This was the beginning of the Palestinian refugee crisis, which remains the most vexing issue between the two peoples to this day. For more information about this, see Benny Morris’ book, “The Birth of the Palestinian Refugee Problem Revisited.” return to top

Q: I keep hearing about the Palestinian Right of Return. What is this about?

A: International law provides that refugees have the right to return to their homes after hostilities have ended and provided they are willing to live in peace. After Israel?s creation, it barred this return. The problem is now much more difficult because some 700,000 to one million refugees in 1948 (with another 200,000 or so created after the 1967 war) have now ballooned to over 4 million, with many other Palestinians scattered around the world, but not living as refugees. Many of these refugees live in camps in the West Bank, Gaza, Syria, Lebanon and within Israel itself. Others have drifted to various places in the Arab world, where they have generally not been welcomed. Still others have left the Middle east altogether. International law was not written with this situation in mind.

Israelis fear that acknowledging any responsibility for the refugees would lead to a massive return of the refugees and Jews then becoming a minority in Israel. For Palestinians, the right of return is viewed as both a right granted to each refugee individually and to the Palestinian people as a group. The former has a sound basis in international law, while the latter does not. Many Palestinian families still have the keys to their former homes.

In practical terms, many of the homes that Palestinians were driven from no longer exist. Indeed, many of their towns are gone today. The international community has generally favored some combination of a return of refugees to a Palestinian state, at least some number returning to Israel and all receiving compensation for their loss and for their years as refugees. A recent poll of Palestinians, while certainly controversial, indicated that only a small percentage would want to exercise a right to return to the area that is now Israel. But Palestinians all over have been very clear on their insistence that they be allowed a free choice in this matter. return to top

Q: Haven’t Jews and Arabs been fighting for thousands of years? Is there really an answer?
A: In fact, Jews and Arabs have been fighting for only about a century. While Jews were facing repeated expulsion and persecution in Europe, Jews in the Muslim world, though still facing some problems, were faring much better. Jews, as People of the Book under Islamic law, were entitled to legal protections and certain rights. To be sure, they were not the equals of Muslims, and there were incidents of anti-Semitism in many parts of the Muslim and Arab world through the centuries, some of them serious. But both the severity and the frequency of these were far lower than in Europe. There is no doubt that the ongoing and brutal conflict between Israel and the Palestinians, as well as the neighboring Arab states, has created a great deal of hatred on both sides. But it is simply false to say that history shows that Jews and Arabs cannot live together. They have before, and, in a modern, secular state, may well be able to do so on a much more equal footing than existed in the past. return to top

A Pro-Israel Approach that Delivers on Palestine

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Ref: New American Foundation


Listen to the dude that askes what´s the problem with Apartheid? Why can´t it be good? And uses the old old pro-israeli rethoric of “continues” jewish statehood in Palestine and in the same breth implies that the Palestines are “recent” in the region. This is a hoax argument that surfaces so often by the Pro-Israelis…

They are incredible these right-wing Pro_israeli americans. Ignorant, hateful and so fucking single minded.

: a